Famous Migraine Sufferers

Think youre alone in suffering from migraines? When the really bad ones hit, it certainly seems as you alone are the only suffering. As a matter of fact, however, not only are migraines incredibly common, but some of the most famous and well-known people in history have suffered from this debilitating neurological disease. Not only have famous people suffered migraines, but some of those people have actually left behind artistic records of their pain and suffering.

Migraine Auras

Migraines come with and without auras. Neither can be said to be less painful than the other, though the aura-less may be less stressful and frightening. Although migraines are often associated with auras, in fact only about 20% of migraine sufferers actually experience any of the symptoms of aura. The aura stage is part of the complex migraine, following the prodome stage. The aura stage usually lasts less than half an hour and its symptoms and effects can vary tremendously from one migraine sufferer to the next.

What is a Migraine?

Weve all heard the term before, but what exactly is a migraine headache? And how does it differ from other headache types? One way to tell its a migraine is by the length of time it lasts. A migraine isnt going to go away in a half-hour. Unless you are very, very, very lucky. Chances are your headache, if it truly is a migraine, is going to last anywhere from four to seventy-two hours.

Attention Deficit Disorder

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), the generic term for all types of the “official” clinical diagnosis called Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), affects nearly 4 percent to 6 percent of the U.S. population, according to the Attention Deficit Disorder Association. An estimated 2 million children in the United States, or some 3 percent to 5 percent of children suffer from ADHD. In short, out of a classroom with about 28 children, the odds are that at least one will have ADHD.

Mild Cognitive Impairment

The term Mild Cognitive Impairment, or MCI, is increasingly being used to describe a syndrome of memory impairment that does NOT significantly impact daily activities and is not accompanied by declines in overall cognitive function. Researchers have found that between 6 and 25 percent of people with MCI progress on to Alzheimer’s, which has raised questions about whether MCI might represent some kind of “transitional stage” between normal aging and dementia.

Dementia With Lewy Bodies

A significant number of people diagnosed with dementia are found to have tiny spherical structures called Lewy bodies in the nerve cells of their brains. It is thought these may contribute to the death of brain cells. The symptoms of this form of dementia are often mild at the outset and can be extremely variable from day to day. Common symptoms include: Fluctuation in the condition Visual hallucinations

Types of Dementia

There are many different forms of dementia and each has its own causes. Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common form of dementia, accounting for between 50% and 70% of all dementias. The effects of the different types of dementia are similar, but not identical, as each one tends to affect different parts of the brain. Dementia, also referred to as senility, is a broad category of brain diseases that cause a long term and often gradual decrease in the ability to think and remember that is great enough to affect a person’s daily functioning.