MDMA, Brazil, Omega-3

MDMA treatment for alcoholism could reduce relapse, a story in the Guardian is reporting.  While it is encouraging to see major media coverage for psychedelics research, the title is a bit misleading. That is because it implies that using MDMA, also known as ecstasy, can treat alcoholism, whereas it is actually MDMA-assisted psychotherapy that is …

Amino Acid Trio Blocks Zika’s Ability To Replicate

A novel formulation of multiple amino acids hinders the replication of Zika virus by up to 90% in human and non-human primate cells, a new study[1] indicates. Researchers tested a unique composition of three free-form amino acids (FFAAP) — cystine, glycine, and glutamate, as well as a minute amount of selenium — that was previously …

No Evidence That ‘Death With Dignity’ Acts Disproportionately Impact Disadvantaged Patients

An analysis of two U.S. states[1] finds evidence that poor, uninsured patients are not being targeted disproportionately by medical aid in dying (MAID) legislation. This retrospective observational cohort study reviewed a combined 28 years of data on MAID from 2 states (Oregon and Washington). Policymakers and researchers have some concerns that MAID could be used …

The Sex Gene SRY And Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease, a debilitating neurodegenerative disease common in elderly people, is twice as prevalent in men than in women. A new study published this month suggests the sex gene (SRY on the male-specific Y chromosome) plays a role in the loss of dopamine-making neurons that underlies this disease. As well as providing a spectacular example …

Testosterone Has A Complex Relationship With Moral Reasoning

Although some studies have linked high levels of testosterone to immoral behavior, a new study finds testosterone supplements actually made people more sensitive to moral norms, suggesting that testosterone's influence on behavior is more complicated than previously thought. Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin took a deeper look at the hormonal underpinnings of …

Low Social Spending Not The Cause Of High Health Care Costs In U.S.

A new study[1] punctures the common argument that the reason the U.S. spends so much more on health care than other countries is because it allocates less to other social services. Some researchers and policymakers maintain that this relative underinvestment in social services has produced a less healthy society, pointing to the lower U.S. ratio …

Alzheimer’s Disease Destroys Neurons That Keep Us Awake

Researchers and caregivers have noted that excessive daytime napping can develop long before the memory problems associated with Alzheimer's disease begin to unfold. Prior studies have considered this excessive daytime napping to be compensation for poor nighttime sleep caused by Alzheimer's-related disruptions in sleep-promoting brain regions, while others have argued that the sleep problems themselves …