The Curse of Knowledge Bias – Ignorance is Bliss?

The curse of knowledge is a cognitive bias that occurs when an individual who is privy to specific information finds it difficult to envision what it’s like not to possess this knowledge. This bias can lead to miscommunication, as the informed individual may overestimate others’ understanding. Cognitive scientists recognize it as a barrier to perspective-taking…

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The Covert Narcissist: Introverted Self-importance

Covert narcissism, often referred to as introverted narcissism or vulnerable narcissism, is a subtype of narcissistic personality disorder characterized by less obvious, internalized grandiosity. Unlike overt narcissism, which is marked by blatant self-importance and a need for admiration, covert narcissists harbor feelings of inadequacy and hypersensitivity to evaluation. Individuals who exhibit covert narcissism typically display traits such…

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What is Observer Bias in Research

Observer bias, a form of detection bias, manifests in observational studies when the individuals conducting the research subtly influence the results based on their own expectations and beliefs. It is a type of cognitive bias that can affect the objectivity of an observation, leading to inaccuracies that may invalidate the research. Observation is crucial for scientific study and activity, and as such,…

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Dismissive Avoidant Attachment Style Signs

Dismissive avoidant attachment is a self-reliant behavior pattern formed in response to early childhood experiences. Those with this attachment style often prioritize independence and self-sufficiency, typically keeping others at a distance. Attachment styles develop during infancy and are influenced by the child’s relationship with their primary caregivers. A dismissive avoidant attachment forms when caregivers are…

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What is the Dunning-kruger Effect?

The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which individuals overestimate their competence in a specific area, often significantly. This concept was introduced by psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger, who observed that people with limited knowledge or ability in a domain are not only prone to making errors but also lack the capability to recognize their…

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Asocial vs Antisocial – Different Social Behaviors

Asocial behavior refers to the lack of motivation to engage in social interaction or the preference for solitary activities. It isn’t necessarily linked to hostility or negative judgments about others. Instead, traits of asociality often involve: A desire for solitude Being introverted or overwhelmed by social situations Individuals displaying asocial traits may still possess empathy and can maintain healthy relationships, but…

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Illusory Correlation: How We Perceive False Connections

Illusory correlation is the process of detecting a relationship between variables (usually individuals, events, or actions) when none exists. A mistaken connection may be created because infrequent or novel occurrences are more prominent and, hence, attract one’s attention. It is different from the correlation fallacy. Key features of illusory correlation include: Implicit Assumptions: Individuals often…

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What is a Dark Empath Personality Type?

The term dark empath refers to individuals who exhibit traits typically associated with empathy, such as the ability to resonate with others’ emotions, while simultaneously displaying characteristics linked to the Dark Triad of personality — narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism. These individuals demonstrate what is known as cognitive empathy, the intellectual capacity to perceive what another…

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Hard-Easy Effect and It’s Cognitive Underpinnings

The Hard–Easy Effect represents a cognitive bias where individuals tend to overestimate their chances of success in tasks they perceive as difficult, and underestimate in those they find easy. It illustrates how subjective perceptions of task difficulty warp one’s confidence levels, distorting the accuracy of one’s predictions regarding outcomes. It shares similarities with other cognitive biases such…

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