Women Aren’t Better Multitaskers Than Men – They’re Just Doing More Work

Multitasking has traditionally been perceived as a woman’s domain. A woman, particularly one with children, will routinely be juggling a job and running a household – in itself a frantic mix of kids’ lunch boxes, housework, and organising appointments and social arrangements. But a new study, published today in PLOS One[1], shows women are actually …

Can Neurotrophin-3 Reduce Anxious Temperament?

Increasing levels of the molecule neurotrophin-3 in the brain can alter dispositional anxiety, the tendency to perceive many situations as threatening, in nonhuman primates, researchers from the University of California, Davis, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found[1]. The molecule, neurotrophin-3, stimulates neurons to grow and make new connections. Hang on a minute though. Before …

Decision Making: Remembering To Choose The Future

From the philosophers of ancient Greece to the self-help books of today, humans have long been interested in choice. Philosophers and ethicists have debated what goals we ought to choose for millennia, and for a century or more economists and psychologists have studied what goals we will choose. In everyday language, we often talk about …

MDMA, Brazil, Omega-3

MDMA treatment for alcoholism could reduce relapse, a story in the Guardian is reporting.  While it is encouraging to see major media coverage for psychedelics research, the title is a bit misleading. That is because it implies that using MDMA, also known as ecstasy, can treat alcoholism, whereas it is actually MDMA-assisted psychotherapy that is …

Amino Acid Trio Blocks Zika’s Ability To Replicate

A novel formulation of multiple amino acids hinders the replication of Zika virus by up to 90% in human and non-human primate cells, a new study[1] indicates. Researchers tested a unique composition of three free-form amino acids (FFAAP) — cystine, glycine, and glutamate, as well as a minute amount of selenium — that was previously …

No Evidence That ‘Death With Dignity’ Acts Disproportionately Impact Disadvantaged Patients

An analysis of two U.S. states[1] finds evidence that poor, uninsured patients are not being targeted disproportionately by medical aid in dying (MAID) legislation. This retrospective observational cohort study reviewed a combined 28 years of data on MAID from 2 states (Oregon and Washington). Policymakers and researchers have some concerns that MAID could be used …