PTSD

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center traveled down the pathways in the brains of mice that trigger fear responses, and which normally extinguish the behaviors once the danger has passed, in order to explore how fear becomes entrenched. Their scientific journey, detailed recently in Nature Neuroscience[1], challenges conventional wisdom about how the brain is “remodeled”… Read more

Imagine you’re a lecturer teaching a celebrated novel that features violent scenes – say, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925). It transpires that one of your students has themselves been a victim of violence and now, thanks to your words, they are reliving their trauma. Could you, should you, have done more to protect… Read more

Moral grandstanding is the use of public moral discourse for self-promotion and status attainment. If you find yourself in an open discussion of morality or politics to impress others with your superior moral qualities, you may be a card-carrying moral grandstander. A new study in PLOS found that grandstanders were more likely to report antagonistic… Read more

Overnight amygdala adaptation fails proportionally to the restlessness of REM sleep, new research from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience suggests. The finding helps explain why you will be better able to bear tomorrow what you are distressed about today, and why that can go wrong. Something frightening or unpleasant does not go unnoticed. In our… Read more

A small structure in the brain could hold the keys to future therapeutic techniques for treating depression, anxiety, and PTSD, someday allowing clinicians to enhance positive memories or suppress negative ones, according to Steve Ramirez, an assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences at Boston University. Inside our brains, a cashew-shaped structure called the hippocampus… Read more