Stages of Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a type of cancer that attacks the lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are cells located mostly in the white blood cells, the lymphoid tissues and the lymph nodes of a person. Where a person is afflicted with lymphoma, the lymphocytes grow abnormally and concentrate mostly on the lymph nodes. As the lymphocytes crowd along the lymph nodes, this causes inflation. An inflamed lymph node is usually one of the first signs a person would feel when he or she is afflicted with lymphoma.

Radiation Therapy Side Effects

Radiation Therapy can cause a range of side effects, including: Hair Loss: also called Alopecia, is the thinning or loss of hair during Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy. Such hair loss can occur anywhere on the body, including the scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, arms, legs, and pelvis, but it is usually only temporary. A patient’s hair normally grows back after the treatment is complete. Nausea Or Vomiting: Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy can cause nausea or vomiting, but these side-effects can be counteracted with other drugs called antiemetics.

Chemotherapy Side Effects

Chemotherapy can cause a range of side effects, including: ** Hair Loss**: also called _Alopecia_, is the thinning or loss of hair during Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy. Such hair loss can occur anywhere on the body, including the scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, arms, legs, and pelvis, but it is usually only temporary. A patient’s hair normally grows back after the treatment is complete. Nausea Or Vomiting: Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy can cause nausea or vomiting, but these side-effects can be counteracted with other drugs called antiemetics.

Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treatment

Non Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a potentially deadly disease that can strike anyone with little to no warning. One of the most drastic factors of this disease is its inability to be normally detected; Non-Hodgkin lymphoma leaves few symptoms, and merely having swollen lymph nodes is the most significantly noticeable symptom. To that end, it can be very difficult to discover that you have the disease. When it comes to treatment for Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, there are several options available.

Diagnosis of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

A number of different tests and examinations are usually required to confirm a diagnosis of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL), and, if the diagnosis is confirmed, assess how far the disease has spread through your body and determine how well your body systems are working. Depending on your situation, the physician may use some or all of these tests to determine the best way to treat your disease. Various tests and scans may be performed to help diagnosis, and also determine a patient’s response to treatment.

Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL) is the most common form of Lymphoma. In fact, out of the 30 subtypes of Lymphoma, 25 types are Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL). That is, most cancers of the Lymphatic System are categorized as Non-Hodgkins Lymphomas. Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma is not a single disease, but rather a group of several closely related cancers that affect the Lymphatic System, which is part of the immune system. NHL is broadly divided into two major groups:

Diagnosis of Hodgkins Lymphoma

The diagnosis of Hodgkins Lymphoma (HL) usually depends on people having abnormal cells, called Reed-Sternberg (R-S) cells, in their blood. Other types of abnormal cell types may be present as well. However, the presence of R-S cells alone does not necessarily mean that an individual definitely has Hodgkins Lymphoma. To confirm a diagnosis, the lymphatic tissue that contains Reed-Sternberg cells must also be surrounded by a background of other cells and features that are characteristic of Hodgkins Lymphoma.

The Immune System

Despite regular attacks from both the exterior and the inside the body, the majority of people manage to stay healthy for nearly all of their lives, because of the protection provided by various defense mechanisms in our bodies. When people do become ill, it is usually short-term in the vast majority of cases. Usually our body is able to fight off the infection and heal itself fairly quickly. Our ability to endure the exposure we receive and the constant attack by external micro-organisms plus internal mutations of bacteria etc which happens every day of our lives depends largely on our Immune System working at an optimum level.