Context Beats Quantity For Teaching Kids New Words

Children learn words best when they hear them in a context that’s understandable, a new study shows. This context is critical for understanding why some words may be easier for kids to learn than others, according to study authors Michael Frank, an associate professor of psychology at Stanford University, and colleagues. The findings suggest that…

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What is Self Awareness (Are You Self Aware?)

Self-awareness is the capacity for introspection and the ability to recognize oneself as an individual separate from the environment and other individuals. It is one of the most important aspects of personal development, determining almost everything else. That includes whether you are able to stay motivated and achieve your goals. “To have greater self-awareness or…

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Memory Loss Among Elderly Lower Than Was Originally Thought

The aptitude to recall specific facts deteriorates with age, but other types of memory do not, according to research by the University of the Basque Country. The study, conducted by Wilma Koutstaal of the University of Minnesota and Alaitz Aizpurua of University of the Basque Country, concludes that the memory of older adults is not…

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Why It’s Hard to Remember Colors

Human vision can distinguish between millions of colors, but we have trouble remembering specific shades because our brains tend to store what we’ve seen as one of just a few basic hues, a Johns Hopkins University-led team has discovered. A team of researchers led by cognitive psychologist Jonathan Flombaum dispute standard assumptions about memory, demonstrating…

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Severely Deficient Autobiographical Memory – Living In Third Person Past

Would you be able to live a healthy, normal life without the ability to re-experience in your mind personal events from your past as memory? What if you learned all the details about past episodes from your life and can recite these to family and friends, but you can’t mentally travel back in time to…

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Peak Cognitive Skill not Limited to the Young

New research from Harvard’s Psychology Department is challenging long-held ideas of how our minds age. It paints a richer picture of different cognitive skills peaking across a lifetime, with at least one, vocabulary, peaking at a time when many are considering retirement. Results from tens of thousands of volunteers who participated in a series of…

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Can Time-based Training Improve Impulse Control?

Increases in both self-control and timing precision as a result of a time-based intervention have been shown by researchers at Kansas State University. The research may be an important clue for developing behavioural approaches to treat disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, substance abuse and obesity. To look at impulsivity, researchers studied rat behaviour, as…

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Political Extremists May be Less Prone to Anchoring Bias

People at the extremes of the political spectrum, whether liberal or conservative, may be less influenced by outside information on a simple estimation task than political moderates, according to new research published in the journal Psychological Science. The study, conducted by Tilburg University’s Mark J. Brandt and Anthony Evans, and The College of New Jersey’s…

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15 Myths About Meditation

Meditation is as complex as your mind is. It is also as simple as sitting down and breathing. But even if you’re not quite sure about the details, you’ve probably heard that meditation is good for you. In addition to managing stress, mindfulness practices have been linked to better outcomes for patients with heart disease,…

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